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straight turnovers to build a ten-point lead in the fourth quarter and they held off a dallas rally for a 100-98 win. >>> in college basketball, cody zeller of top ranked indiana scored 20 points as the hoosiers rolled over number 14 north carolina, 83-59. >>> number three michigan got 16 points from tim hardaway jr. including a lay-up in the closing minutes. the wolverines held on to beat north carolina state, 79-72. >>> and the former leader of the major league baseball players association marvin miller has died at 95. he won free agency for players in 1975 creating the era of multi-million dollar contracts. one former commissioner called miller baseball's most important figure of the last 50 years. >>> well, just ahead, remorse on the set of "two and a half men." >>> plus, north korean dictator kim jong un celebrates his heartthrob status, well, at least in china. you're watching "early today." >>> welcome back to "early today." i'm here live at nbc's 30 rockefeller plaza. behind me you'll see what is the lit-up christmas tree. tonight it will be chilly, but a great show here liv
-school in dallas or houston, we want to be able to admit that students. the university of texas is saying we want to consider race sometimes and that is what the dispute is about. the critics say, no, it is wrong to consider race and you don't need to do it in this case. you've got a reasonable amount of racial diversity. host: let's turn to another case -- as you enter that, i will show that had line from "the wall street journal." answer to't know the that question. i think it would be unlikely, however. justice scalia is 76 and justice kennedy is 76. they are both generally on the right side of the court. justice ruth better ginsburg will be 80 in the spring. she is the oldest of the justices on the liberal side. if you had to guess who was going to leave in the next four years, i think the standard guess would be justice ginsburg. it was very important for the ideological makeup of the court whether barack obama or mitt romney is president of united states because it justice ginsburg had left and another conservative justice came in, that could have changed the balance of the court. if, in th
. >> reporter: on this night in dallas, aldean is using that success to promote a cause that is deeply personal for him and his wife, jessica. >> actually married to my cousin which is how jason and i met. >> reporter: family friend melissa morstad died from breast cancer eight years ago. >> here she is leaving three little girls and so young, 29 years old. and she died. >> reporter: for the last seven years, aldean has held a concert for the cure, the annual event orchestrated by jessica, on ticket sales and merchandise, to benefit the susan g. komen foundation. >> every year it's gotten bigger and better. >> reporter: keeping pace with aldean's career, donations are growing steadily and significantly. >> we have finally hit the $500,000 mark. $590,000. thank you guys so much! >> reporter: it's the kind of moment that provides a glimpse of jason aldean, the man, devoted to family and prevent, which is why fame is sometimes an unwelcomed spotlight. in september, photographs surfaced showing aldean embracing and apparently kissing another woman in los angeles. he apologized saying he had too muc
to be a pretty good incentive to get somebody to drive. sheppard is a nice place. dallas is into fiery there. do they still guarantee you guys a fighter at it in so? >> now, pretty much the same as anywhere else. >> that was the same in damage. when i went through, if you were to shepherd you were going to get a fighter. there was some good ones, but the most part they got a lot of fighters. it's probably better that way and more fair all around. what else? underwent okmulgee guys up. okay, well thanks for coming very much. i appreciate it. if you guys buy the book, even better. harpercollins actually send me up to read a couple more. one is nonfiction. it's the history of fighter pilot, not just americans, but all of them. i've been burning how much i didn't know about my own profession. it's going to be a very interesting book. it's due sometime next year, so i'll take another six months after that, so maybe 2014. and then there's a fictional book i wrote called the mercenary that will be out in e-book form to start with i think in january or february. unlike most good fiction, it's not really
states in every state including texas. this is a vibrant place in dallas. people are moving here in droves. we have an honest to goodness fair government. thank you very much. guest: thank you for your kind words about me. taxes is growing by leaps and bounds. this is made our country much more energy independent and has brought the price of natural gas down. i hope we can agree we don't want to reverse that and continue to go forward with these wonderful changes that have taken place in energy. we have a chance to see a renaissance in manufacturing. a lot of these jobs going overseas may come home. i have been asked and i would make three quick points. i think this election was about a lot of things. i think it is more complicated than that. i would start with the candidates. mitt romney is a good man. he wasn't as natural a communicator as the president . he had a habit of saying things that didn't help him. the president is a natural and gifted communicator. the democrats had a much better get out the vote operation. republicans need to focus on that. democrats were better in
and their recovery. let's go to james in dallas, texas. caller: good morning. the answer to your question. it is very difficult to have a lot of confidence in the security team regardless of what happened in benghazi. the president could have come out and given the public the truth. a lot of callers will call in and say people do not like barack obama because of his skin color. i voted for barack obama in 2000 because of his skin color. i wanted this country to get passed a landmark issue of electing a african-american for president. one of your earlier callers mentioned the daywear the target. i see no reason why this administration did not take action. if they did not take action because they did not know what was happening, i think there is evidence they did know what was happening, it is unforgivable. if they did not know what was going on, that is even more inexcusable. host: manhattan, kansas. dave is an independent caller. caller: i just wanted to say the foreign policy of obama is a spitting image of bush. we have droned more pakistan as than bush under obama. it is only creating more terrori
was changed to include the vice president. imagine what it would have been like in dallas. but lucy did not get her day free from the secret service. >> she could get almost anything but not that. you had many unique experiences. i believe the only prom held in the white house and one of the very few weddings. >> it was very exciting. as a matter of fact, the previous big wedding was alice longworth. princess alice, they called her. in our day, she was the cat's meow in washington. she said -- she had a palo that said if you do not have anything nice to say to anybody, come and sit next to me. [laughter] she was wonderful to listen to as long as she wasn't saying anything bad about you. but she came to our wedding. i mean, she was fascinating. imagine, teddy roosevelt's daughter -- you talk about a rebel. susan and i were just pussycats. are father said i can either be president or i can take care of dallas. [laughter] her father said you may not smoke under my roof, so she smoked of the roof. [laughter] she had a little green snake which was called emily spinach which she put on her sh
of wild bees, distant stars, and frontier pioneers. the dallas morning news reported that the audience listened to the poet's words, quote, "with the strictist attention with applause." now, the next speaker, the chief justice of texas spoke in prose. his review was nowhere near as good as the poet received. [laughter] now, in light of that, i thought the best course would be for me to compos a poem for this occasion. [laughter] again, there's no need to panic or run for the exits. i gave up that plan when i couldn't find suitable words that rimed with latin terms. [laughter] president lovitt spoke third and delivered the speech titled "the meaning of the new stietion." his essay is, in fact, a truly magnificent scholarly work with a thoughtful and prophetic vision on what the institution would become. i want to focus on one point he made observing a great challenge on any institution is, quote, to plan at one and the same time for the immediate future and for the next 100 years. now at the century mark, it's safe to say that president lovitt and six presidents who followed him met the
number two. >> one apartment building in dallas, texas, is making sure pet owners do just that. every resident with a pet must have their four-legged friend swabbed for a dna sample. this is gross. that data is then used to identify which pet's mess was left behind. so if you don't clean up after your pet, you could face a $250 fine or even eviction. >> we've gone from maybe picking up an hour a day of pop to picking up maybe one or two a month. >> it seems like there's bigger problems than pick up dog pop. i don't know. >> depends how big it is, right? on top of all that, the company that does the testing is proposing the rule to dallas city councils. wouldn't you like to be the one to test it. >> i don't want to do that. >>> oh, let's move it along here. the wizards go for their first victory of the season. the cavaliers win in thrilling fashion. >> lou holder has the highlights in this morning's "sports minute." >> good morning, everyone. and your "sports minute" starts with a little college football. randy edsall taking a trip to death valley taking on clemson and this one got ugl
is anna from the dallas-fort worth world affairs council. i teach seniors, so i have been facebooking for the conference and the ask questions and i answer back and i've already scanned my notes. the point is they want to know for this -- right now because they are on line with the -- should they be optimistic? they're very scared, the class of 2013. what can i pass on to them about economic competitiveness and they should be optimistic or worried? >> great question from the seniors. okay, steve. slingbox >> notwithstanding everything i said before -- [laughter] i'm actually optimistic. i'm optimistic because heidi ticked off a number of these before in a slightly different context. we have the most flexible economy in the world. we have this incredibly diverse labor force and a diverse group of people in this country that come here because the opportunity. there aren't that many people that leave america to go all these other places that we worry about being more competitive than we are the there's a long line of people that still want to come here. immigration is a big issue in this
industrial complex? what happened in dallas? the assassination of john f. kennedy, sunday at 7:30 p.m. eastern and pacific. >> democratic and republican congressional leaders are voicing optimism about avoiding tax increases and automatic spending cuts in january, the so-called fiscal cliff. leaders from both the house and senate met with president obama this morning at the white house, their first discussion in negotiation on the fiscal cliff. the president started the day with comments to reporters. >> i want to welcome the congressional leadership here and thank them for their time. i think we're all aware that we have some urgent business to do and we got to make sure that taxes don't go up on middle class families, that our economy will remain strong, that we're creating jobs and that is an agenda that democrats and republicans and independents, people all across the country share. so our challenge is to make sure that we are able to cooperate together, work together, find some common ground, make some tough compromises, build some consensus to do the people's business and what
's what it's about. >> for cbs "this morning," manuel bojorquez, dallas. >>> he was here. he's a really great guy. for what he's been through, cheater, cheater, pumpkin eaters, you never know. what about her. you never do until you're in that situation. they decided to work it out. i think that's good for them. >> i'm a big fan of his music and wish them the best. >> steven spielberg's new movie "lincoln" brings our 6th president to life. doris kearns goodwin booking brought the president to the big screen. >>> things which are equal to the same thing are equal to each other. that's a rule. it's true because it works. has done and always will do. >> daniel day-lewis plays the title role in the new movie "lincoln" and he's a knockout. based on the best selling book "team of rivals" by doris kearns goodwin. good morning. >> good morning. i'm glad to be here. >> this is so great to have this book released at the time of the movie. you've done a lot of biographies of presidents and you spent ten years on lincoln. why lincoln? >> i think after i finished franklin and eleanor roosevelt and th
, castro, military-industrial complex, what happened in dallas, the assassination of john f. kennedy, sunday at kevin:30 p.m. eastern and pacific. >> florida senator marco rubio will be in ireland, he will speak at a fund-raiser, and the first trip to iowa. >> earlier this week retiring massachusetts congressman barney frank talked about sequestration and upcoming fiscal cliff negotiations which he believes will cause a, quote, short-term bumps to the economy. he spoke at an event in the atlantic. it is 20 minutes. >> congressman barney frank in his last term as congressman, too big to fail and author of the deal breaker column in the new york times and cnbc, what is it? scrawled box. i watch it every day. and half of dodd-frank here. >> thank you. thank you for being here. about 100 things to talk about in a short amount of time and a lot of issues related to wall street, given the water cooler conversation seems to be the last 72 hours, general david petraeus and the real housewives of tampa. i figured i would give you the floor to tell us your thoughts. >> having argued to, and to
for a b. in dallas they've tried offering second graders $2 for each book they read. now, some people think this is a promising idea, other people aren't very happy about it. so let's have a discussion here and begin by taking a survey of opinion. if you were the superintendent of one of these school districts and you were approached with this proposal, how many think it's a good idea worth trying, and is how many would object in principle? be let's see, first, those of you who -- how many would object? how many would not like this idea? quite a few. and how many think it's worth trying? all right. we have a pretty good division of opinion. let's begin by those who object. who is willing to explain, to offer your reason? why do you think this would be objectionable in principle in -- principle? anyone? who will start us off? yes, stand up, and we'll get you a microphone. go ahead. >> i would -- >> over here. >> i would object because there's a basic value in learning, there's a basic value in learning, a basic excitement about learning new things. if you start paying for that, you rem
running into the convention. the front page of the "dallas morning news," or the "fort worth star-telegram," "g.o.p. shifts on immigration." the dallas morning news -- it was amaze together see, that, wow, we're going to come in here and label them as antianything, and it was a total different route. then some people came to me and some friends of mine said we've got to take this to the national level. we went to the national platform in tampa and started talking about it. we got a national guest worker endorsement on the national republican platform, which was great. thought my work was over. election day hits and wednesday my phone starts getting blown up again. it's time to get back in the debate again. we need to start doing more, we need to start talking about this. you know, i believe free-market solutions are a part of this. i believe in strong border security. the anti-immigration groups will try to label us as open borders, big business wants cheap labor. i can tell you, if we can fund blackwater security forces in iraq or some type of security force that is licensed and
, which have offices all overt country, not just here in new york. they're in dallas. they could have set autopsy contingency plan to keep the markets open. i think that it's important that markets stay open. you need to know the value of ibm. like i said, two days, not a big deal. suppose it was two weeks? firms can't get financing. no one knows ha their portfolio is, that could be bad. >> gretchen: because officials had contingency plans since 9-11. they provide office space for people who live in the suburbs to go to their own desk and a computer. i'm just saying why the stock market didn't. >> yes. listen, yes. they do have contingency plans to basic work. but they don't have contingency plans to keep the markets running. i spent 20 minutes with a guy from goldman sachs to try to get him to tell me what exactly is this contingency plan? why couldn't you open up an office in akron, ohio and do some trading? they couldn't really tell me. it's kind of pathetic after 9-11. >> peter: it's well said. they had a chance after 9-11 to do something and they haven't done it. so three strikes, we
states, atlanta, dallas, los angeles -- who is doing that reporting here? so much attention is focused on what is happening in mexico, we are lamenting the strengths or weaknesses of reporting in mexico. the mexican reporters, especially the regional ones, were hardest hit. it is the once in these regional outlets like tijuana. they want to know who was telling the other side of the story and who is doing the money reporting, all these narco dollars. who is doing the story about money laundering? i do not know if i answered your question, but that is certainly a kind of push back there. who is telling the good story and -- big story and the small story? >> let me bring in carrie lozano to the conversation. she is a documentary filmmaker and journalist who has done a lot of work. her from "underground" appeared at sundance. also, she is an emerging expert on the question of collaborative reporting, journalists, between news organizations, citizens, she works in the investigative reporting for uc berkley and has co-founded the collaboration central. very basic question -- who is doing th
-mail or allowing people to vote in districts where they do not live, provisional bots. -- dallas. -- provisional ballots. i do not know that it is more democrats than republicans. i suppose, it could drive down the popular vote for obama nationally, but i don't know that it will necessarily do that in any of the states that were hit. host: kristie from tennessee. caller: we all know as americans, whether we are democratic or republican to run a health care reform is very important. i am a political science major at my state college. i know a little bit about the dynamics of how politics works on an elementary level. you say in your article that obama and the next four years would be willing to cut deals with republicans, possibly. why if he was elected in 2008, why didn't you listen to the voices in congress on the republican side, and why did he pushed through a health care reform act that all of us as americans feel so strongly about? it would have been so nice if he had chosen by partition chip -- bipartisanship then and we would not be in a stalemate. of americans, a lot do like obamacare. i
in the u.s. navy. after earning his jd from smu he worked in dallas' largest law firms -- lesson in health care matters. later, and come in the columbia hospital corporation, established what has become the largest for-profit health care conglomerate in the nation. columbia hca employs over 199,000 people. that's job creation for you. [applause] and provides quality health care for millions of people. but he didn't rest there. he and his wife, and, i worked with a group called world vision to provide primary health care system in bengali, kenya and does governor to step up its commitment to the people of florida, emphasizing the importance of accountability he ran his campaign under the slogan, let's get to work on a free system resonates with flirting today. his policies to foster economic asperity. under his leadership, he 25 months of consecutive job growth. so we have a notch bringer who succeeded in the air and translated success in the governments here. sadly, governor scott's mother very recently passed away come at the yeti is still here today managing to fulfill his commitment to
in dallas? 30 p.m. eastern and pacific. >> truman got into politics after having failed that many businesses as a young man. the only way to get into politics in the missouri was to be part of a machine. he looked up with the pending breast machine, which was the most corrupt and often -- tender grass machine which was the most corrupt and often vicious. the second is what we all know about, how did he come to use the atomic bomb? what was behind the decision? what is the story behind the atomic bomb before he became president, and then when the decision was on his desk? it is still a controversial story, i wanted to know more about it. >> from his early life through his presidency, aida donald looks up the life of harry truman sunday night at 8:00 p.m. on c-span's "q&a." >> "washington journal" continues. host: joining us now is anna edney, who reports on the fda and other issues for bloomberg news. this issue stemmed from what is known as a compound in pharmacy. can you give us a history of what this is about? guest: they are looking to see if this could have been prevented. the pharmacy h
in dallas? global security leaders gathered in nova scotia to discuss pressing security and defense issues. the summit is addressing server security, modern warfare, syria, and china. this panel looks at the global perception of leadership in the world and advancement of military technology. this is just over one hour. >> ladies and gentlemen, welcome. i am the editor of foreign affairs. it is a privilege and honor and pleasure to be here at the halifax form. foreign affairs is in the business of serious discussion of important issues and questions. that is the same business halifax is in. we are delighted to be a sponsor. it will be a fantastic weekend. let me cut to the chase. we have a fantastic panel and topic and limited time. let's get right to it. david sanger, paula dobriansky, now at harvard, wolfgang ischinger, the head of the munich security conference. we have a great group. the point of this session is to do big thinking on the major trends that will set up other discussions for the weekend. the title is, what is the new normal and when will it get here? had halifax existed 15
' american history tv, 30 years later the questions remain. what happened in dallas? the assassination of john f. kennedy today at 7:30 p.m. eastern and pacific. >> truman had two big puzzles in his life. the first was, this was a man who got into politics having failed at many businesses as a young man. the only way to get into politics in missouri was to be part of a machine. there were two machines. he hooked up with the pendergast machine, which was the most corrupt and often vicious machine. i said to myself, how did this happen? how could he possibly work in this machine in local politics? that was the first thing i had to work out. the second is what we all know about. how does he come to use the atomic bomb? what was behind the decision? what is the story about the atomic bomb before he became president and then when the decision was on his desk? it is still a controversial story. i wanted to know more about it. >> from his early life through his presidency, a look at the early life of president truman tonight at 8 p.m. on c-span's "q & a." host: joining us from new york is jus
for the ceremony. this is drawn from an indian legend invokes wild bees, stars, and frontier pioneers. "the dallas morning news" reported the audience listened with the strictist attention with frequent applause. now, the next speaker, the chief justice spoke in prose. his review was nowhere near as good as the poet received. [laughter] in light of that, i thought the best course would be for me to compos a poem for this occasion. [laughter] there's no need to panic or run for the exits i gave up the plan and couldn't think of words that rhymed with lat latin legal terms. [laughter] the essay is, in fact, a truly magnificently scholarly work presents thoughtful and prophetic vision of what the rice institution would become. i want to focus on one point made. he observedded the great challenge in creating any constitution is, quote, "to plan at one in the same time for the immediate future and for the next 100 years." we're now at the century mark, and it's safe to say president lovitt and the six presidents who followed him met his challenge. rice's academic programs ranging from space, science, a
tab. on october 7, sergeant first class riley g. steaches was laid to rest at the dallas-forth worth national cemetery, not far from his hometown. while earlier that day his life was celebrated and his service to our country was celebrated in a church full of friends and family and fellow patriots. our thoughts and prayers are with the family and friends of mr. stevens. he will forever be remembered as an outstanding soldier, husband, father and friend. we thank them for his service to our country. john 15-13 which says greater love hath no man than this than the man who laid down his life for his friends. as i close, mr. speaker, i'd like to ask all americans to continue praying for our country during these difficult times, for our military men and women and for our first responders who keep us safe by their sacrifice each day. god bless our military, -- military men and women and god bless america. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the chair recognizes the gentlewoman from hawaii, ms. hirono, for five minutes. ms. hirono: mr. speaker, i rise today to introduce a resolution com
in four airports, orlando, denver, san francisco, and dallas-ft. worth with more to come. clear allows travelers to bypass regular security lines. the process is simple, you swipe your clear card in a kiosk, verify your identity with a fingerprint or iscan and move through security. a few things to note, clear costs 200 bucks a year. while members do not have to pay to be part of precheck, there's a cost of about $100 to apply to a u.s. trusted program to be eligible. >> six months ago, they said, you're precheck, get in the precheck. for a long time, i traveled a lot, a wicked lot, so if your a frequent traveler, they put you in that program. >> i thought with precheck, you have to actually sign up for it. >> nope. >> and go through a background check? >> they may have done a background check on me, i'm clean. but it wasn't at my request. the airline, my frequent flyer programs may have put me up for it. >> that's so interesting. >> but you don't always know if you can do it, so you still have to plan for the time in the line. >> i'm surprised every time when they put me in this magic
. 36 as high as you'll go. nation's midsection, check it out from fargo, 33. 62 in dallas. very breezy in new orleans today. and you can expect it cool and dry through the plains. farther out towards the west, you can see some rain in the valleys. mountains can be expected over the cascades. very dry for you across the four corners. highs mainly in the 40s, fifth and even some 80s across the region. in terms of travel weather, a lot of have you to go out and about today. you have to fly around the country. you can expect some backups. new york and washington, minor delays. they may stack up a bit into the afternoon, so be patient out there. and then boston, seattle, mostly minor. los angeles, no issues to speak of. a little marine layer, but you should be just fine. let's pitch it back to you you. >> did you actually just run out to the set? did we catch you? >> a little bit kind of sort of, but not really. i was really intrigued by last block. we heard a little bit of corduroy the bear and the societal collapse. >> sorry. >> are you kidding me? i was terrified last block the stuff we
states. really there's some concentrated areas. there's places like, you know, dallas/fort worth area, places like southern california and the seattle area where boeing -- and also in missouri where they build some of the military aircraft. but it's the minority of the states in the country. and the notion that this spreads all over the place is not borne up by the few actual surveys that have been done. the pentagon was forced to do some years ago a study on subcontracting, and they found that these main areas where the prime contracts were also received many of the subcontracts. so i think there is more of a concentration of pentagon spending than would be suggested. and then in the areas like virginia where senator mccain, senator kelly ayotte of new hampshire, senator lindsey graham of south carolina, you know, took the scare tour and talked about shipbuilding, talked about military bases, talked about defense consulting firms in northern virginia, um, that argument didn't fly in the elections even though they tried to pin these potential effects on president obama. he carried vir
, dedicated and hardworking gentleman from dallas, mr. sessions. let me say, mr. speaker, that there are lots of hard workers in this house. and there are -- we all learn as kids there's a differentiation between a workhorse and a show horse. i got to tell you, mr. speaker, and you know this very well, there is no democrat or republican in the united states house of representatives who works any harder, any harder than pete sessions, and i'm very pleased, mr. speaker, that he's going to be succeeding me as chairman of the house rules committee and i of course yield to him such time as he may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas is recognized for such time as he may consume. mr. sessions: mr. speaker, thank you very much. and to my dear and distinguished friend, the gentleman, the young chairman of the rules committee, david dreier, thank you very much. it is david's leadership, not just in the rules committee, but i believe to all of us here in the house of representatives that david has let us to be a more open, thoughtful body, person who used his time and position, po
happened in dallas? the assassination of john f. kennedy sunday at 7:30 p.m. eastern and pacific. >> more now on the congressional investigation into the meningitis outbreak from today's "washington journal" and is about 35 minutes. host: joining us now is anna edney, who reports on the fda and other issues for bloomberg news. this issue stemmed from what is known as a compound in pharmacy. can you give us a history of what this is about? guest: they are looking to see if this could have been prevented. the pharmacy has been around since 1998, 1999, and there have been complaints from other states, basically since about a year from when it started. lawmakers were trying to figure out if more could have been done in the state of massachusetts, or if the food and drug administration could have been investigating it more apparent maybe it could have or should have been -- more. maybe it could have or should have been shut down. they are asking the massachusetts officials and the food and drug administration whether they were doing enough. the question is whether they were doing compounding,
was around dallas because of budget cuts. remember, this is a disease spread by mosquitoes. texas has no entomologist anymore. they cut the position because they ran out of money. >> for over a century, the u.s. fire service had the task of extinguishing any fire that was started on federal land. that wound up with a situation where we have these huge, hot, devastating forest fires in the modern era. is our public health policy doing something similar? >> is an interesting metaphor, but i do not know if it is completely transferable. >> what about the trend in decline of vaccination. another colleague wrote a book called the panic virus. he talked about the virus spread of belief that vaccinations make people sick, especially children. vaccinations cause autism, among other things. a lot of science shows that is a false concern, but it has led to a serious decline of rates of vaccination in children in some areas. >> let's not completely step away from the point that was just made. it is an interesting idea. there is another way of looking at that, and this is that there has been an i
. likes her baseball. halfway between dallas and beautiful fort worth. domenic celestini of sterling heights, michigan. 100 years old today. secret to longevity, love 6 his beautiful wivch they really are devoted to each other. etie lopez, sulphur, louisiana, 102 years old. secret to longevity, sweet potatoes. i believe the secret to life is sweet potatoes, sweet potato pie and butter, remember that. you heard it here. david plaisted, pearl river, new york, 101 years old today. police officer for several years, also an avid golfer but not when he was a police officer. he either policed or golfed. >> middletown, rhode island is home to rachel davis, 100 years old. loves to read eight books a week. put the kindle people in business. how nice it is to be with you. back to new york. >> all right, willard, thank you very much. this morning we're wrapping up our series thanks and giving highlighting 50 years of the great work done at st. jude's children's hospital. marlo thomas has been with us all week, the national outreach director at st. jude. it's been so wonderful to have this all we
, february 1st 1967 i thought of my goldman sachs. on february 1st 1967, the dallas roughly 850. lo and behold, 15 years later was it okay. and i made my money by flying things that were very cheap. so our 700 of the doubt, equivalent. even though the old world market was going nowhere. i can very well appreciated scenario for the cause in need of government around the world to get the financial house in order of the next two years we can remain in environment at see we deal with the fiscal cliff, as we deal with the huge deficit issues in the market and sees a need to deal an intelligent fashion. so unprepared. you folks are young, early 20s, late teens, whatever tissue can muster another three years for this. as i said at the beginning life expectancy is 82. another three years is going to be very painful to me, but i'm going to do it. i'm going to work out of because this what i love doing and have an obligation to do. i took somebody's money and effort to manage it intelligently improperly. i'm a value investor. some of her versus what is a investor meeting? what it means to me
gunman, the mob, cia, castro, the military industrial complex. what happened in dallas? sunday at 7:30 eastern. president obama says he and congressional leaders have urgent business to do mentioning tax rates for the middle class and job creation. the statement came before a meeting with congressional leaders at the white house. >> i want to welcome the congressional leadership here and thank them for their time. i think we're all aware that we have some urgent business to do and we got to make sure that taxes don't go up on middle class families, that our economy will remain strong, that we're creating jobs and that is an agenda that democrats and republicans and independents, people all across the country share. so our challenge is to make sure that we are able to cooperate together, work together, find some common ground, make some tough compromises, build some consensus to do the people's business and what folks are looking for and i think all of us agree on this is action. they want to see that we are focused on them, not focused on our politics here in washington. so my hope
couples to be allowed to marry for each stray couple of his divorced. congratulations dallas vegas, you're about to be the case city in america. and to finally bring transparency back to political process, like drugs and cigarettes, hd piece of legislation must clearly state the possible side effects and must be titled, to reflect its actual content. thus the picture that will be renamed fescue thomas jefferson. we don't stop there. our manifesto will enlighten the american people with chapters entitled the elitist scourge, how to a people who are better than you. the metric system, exactly ten times more often than imperial units. we peeled off the layers of america. american exceptional wasn't about to make other countries feel bad about the bodies. we present practical solutions and how to relieve america's sexual tension. crime and punishment, and then come again. we even created simple multiple choice questionnaires for healthy american children determine the value as future americans. and to reinvigorate the youth vote, many of which are right here, we have invented a drinking gam
. dallas morning news chronicle -- amazing to see that, wow, we were going to come in here labeling them as anti-his panic, anti-anything, and it was a total different route. people came to me and friends of mine said we got to take this to the national level. we went to the national platform in tampa, talk about it, got a national guest worker endorsement on the republican national convention platform which was great. thought work was over, and election day hit, and wednesday my phone blows up again, and it's time to getÑjr back in the debate again. we have to do more. we have to talk about this. you know, i believe free market solutions are a part of this. i believe in strong border security. the anti-immigration groups will try to label us as open borders, big business, wants cheap labor. i can tell you if we can fund blackwater security forces in iraq, and i'm not say using blackwater, but a type of security force that's licensed in doing a good job, we need to do that. we need to secure our borders. in texas, i can tell you, i've been down first hand in burkes county texas the effe
the convention and, you know, the front page of the dallas morning news, or fort worth star-telegram, gop shifts on immigration. it was amazing to see that wow, we were going to come in here and label them anti-hispanic, anti-anything. it was a total different route. vincent cable came to me, some friends of mine said we've got to take this to the national level. we went to the national platform and started talking about it. we got a national guest worker endorsement on the republican national convention platform which was great. thoughts my work was over, then election day hit. wednesday my phone starts getting blown up again. it's time to quÉbec in the debate again. we need to start talking about this. i believe the free market solutions are a part of this. i believe in strong security. the anti-immigration groups will try to label us as open borders, big business wants cheap labor. i can tell you if we can fund blackwater security forces in iraq, and announcing -- some type of security force that its license in doing a good job, we need to do that. we need to secure our borders. i can tell y
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